​A new study finds that people today who eat and exercise the same amount as people 20 years ago are still fatter.

A study published recently in the journal Obesity Research & Clinical Practice found that it's harder for adults today to maintain the same weight as those 20 to 30 years ago did, even at the same levels of food intake and exercise.
The authors examined the dietary data of 36,400 Americans between 1971 and 2008 and the physical activity data of 14,419 people between 1988 and 2006. They grouped the data sets together by the amount of food and activity, age, and BMI.

They found a very surprising correlation: A given person, in 2006, eating the same amount of calories, taking in the same quantities of macronutrients like protein and fat, and exercising the same amount as a person of the same age did in 1988 would have a BMI that was about 2.3 points higher. In other words, people today are about 10 percent heavier than people were in the 1980s, even if they follow the exact same diet and exercise plans.
"If you are 25, you'd have to eat even less and exercise more than those older, to prevent gaining weight."

"Our study results suggest that if you are 25, you'd have to eat even less and exercise more than those older, to prevent gaining weight," Jennifer Kuk, a professor of kinesiology and health science at Toronto's York University, said in a statement. "However, it also indicates there may be other specific changes contributing to the rise in obesity beyond just diet and exercise."

.... Kuk and the other study authors think that the microbiomes of Americans might have somehow changed between the 1980s and now. It's well known that some types of gut bacteria make a person more prone to weight gain and obesity. Americans are eating more meat than they were a few decades ago, and many animal products are treated with hormones and antibiotics in order to promote growth. All that meat might be changing gut bacteria in ways that are subtle, at first, but add up over time. Kuk believes the proliferation of artificial sweeteners could also be playing a role.

The fact that the body weights of Americans today are influenced by factors beyond their control is a sign, Kuk says, that society should be kinder to people of all body types.

"There's a huge weight bias against people with obesity," she said. "They're judged as lazy and self-indulgent. That's really not the case. If our research is correct, you need to eat even less and exercise even more" just to be same weight as your parents were at your age.

Please read full and subscribe to:

http://www.theatlantic.com/health/archive/2015/09/why-it-was-easier-to-be-skinny-in-the-1980s/407974/?single_page=true

No comments:

Post a Comment